Did you Photoshop that?

Peter B. GiblettStarred Page By Peter B. Giblett, 31st Aug 2014 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/vmrhxppb/
Posted in Wikinut>Writing>Tips

One of the things that is true is that we can so easily play with photographic images using tools like Photoshop - indeed it is almost assumed that when you see a clever piece of trick photography it must have been played with. Yet today I present a few clever photographs which may have been played with.

Altered or not?

We live in such a visual world that everything should be associated with graphical imagery, indeed I have always loved photography, even when I had to develop my own black and white film, something best forgotten in the modern world.

Let's be honest, software like Photoshop, has allowed us to take any mundane image and add sparkle to it, make the background brighter, remove that dirty trash can from the otherwise perfect shot, change the colour of a building from white to pink. Indeed Photoshopping has become a noun that we use when we are fixing any photograph that we wish to be altered to make it a little more like the image we want to see, whether or not we are using that brand of software.

Whenever we see some clever photography we tend to think of it as an altered image rather than a natural picture, yet there are many pictures we can take using a simple camera that actually look as if they have been Photoshopped. Take a look at the following picture and think about whether it was is altered or not, and I will discuss the picture in the next section.

A rainy day?

There it is, what is your feeling - reality or an altered image?

I love the way that this picture bends everything, the car and the bench in the foreground as well as the petrol/gas station in the background.

This is a real photograph, with no modifications - the only thing I have done was modify the image so that it could be uploaded onto Wikinut because the original is more than 7 Mb in size. The way I took this picture was sit in the car facing the scene at the time when it was raining - I had nothing to do and had no desire to drive off down the road in such serious rain, then I noticed how the rain on the windscreen played tricks with what could be seen which motivated me to reach for the camera. It is the rain on the windscreen that caused the effects you can see, nothing else.

Another view

On this shot there are no raindrops on the windscreen, yet things like the the lampposts and bench appear all distorted. This is still a real shot albeit that the effects are different here.

To some extent this picture reminds me of the painting entitled "Paris: A Rainy Day" by French artist Gustave Caillebotte except this picture is by Peter Giblett and was taken at Lundy's Lane in Niagara Falls.

A Definite Altered Image

There is no doubt the image used in this section is altered - the picture of this old shoe has been made to look like a sketch and I have to say that this is one of the things I have recently been playing with. This picture was taken with cartoon camera software on my Android phone. Such options do exist with Photoshop and I know of people who have gone to great lengths to mix cartoon type images with reality using the various layers that are available on Photoshop, personally I have not played about enough with the software to make it do that for me. What I like about this picture is the way the floorboards are so clear in the foreground, yet fade away to a general hue in the background and it is things like that which can make a picture more powerful.

Today it is important to use a variety of tools to make things work for you and in truth not everything has to be Photoshopped any more. The following articles also show examples of sketching:

However if you take a look at the image associated with the following article you should see it is all a matter of perspective which can also :

Tips on Altered Images

This photograph was altered using Photoshop. Most people should recognise the building as being the Taj Mahal, yet it has been subtly altered. For those that know the Taj Mahal is made of white marble so stands as a clearly white monument which should be clear for all to see, yet I altered this image to make it pink, just as if the picture were taken at sunset or sunrise as if the sun was actually behind me and there was enough haziness in the sky to change the colour of the building.

As it happens these types of weather conditions are very rare in India, but is the type of affect that would be possible if this famous monument were located somewhere like England. You should also notice that the pink hue has only been applied to the building and not the tree that is in front of it - because Photoshop allows layering and it is therefore possible to split the foreground from the building, from the sky if you desire to do so. Someone suggested using a purple hue, but I have to say that the result would have looked unnatural, as does a green coloured Taj Mahal.

A Green Taj?

I suppose I could not resist putting that image up for all to see. The impact of the green is vastly different to that of the pink - also altered using that famous piece of software. Today I would have to say that If I am playing with images then I will use PaintNet, IrfanView, and other free/open source software.

The following are some of the more recent articles that I have published on a variety of topics, which is now more than 470 articles on Wikinut.

Each person has a unique voice and Wikinut is great a place for you to share some of your wisdom, insight and knowledge, you could start by adding a comment, but perhaps you need something more in which case should join Wikinut, write then become connected to others who share a passion for writing, supporting one another, and learning on Wikinut.

Tags

Effects, Lundys Lane, Peter B Giblett, Photograph, Photoshop, Photoshopped, Photoshopping, Rainy Day, Real Photograph, Sketch, Taj Mahal

Meet the author

author avatar Peter B. Giblett
Author of "Is your Business Ready? For the Social Media Revolution"

Social media consultant, with C-Level background.

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Comments

author avatar Ptrikha
1st Sep 2014 (#)

The Pink and Green Taj tricks are awesome!

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author avatar Peter B. Giblett
1st Sep 2014 (#)

I would have thought the Indians in the crowd would hate that piece of Photo art.

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author avatar snerfu
1st Sep 2014 (#)

I do not see any cats and dogs though turning Taj pink should be applauded.

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author avatar Retired
1st Sep 2014 (#)

I used to take photos (in the pre-digital days) using a variety of lens filters that produced all sorts of effects - colour changes, starbursts, rainbows, the lot! I don't know if you can still do this with modern cameras, or if all the trickery is now done post-exposure.

One of my best photos - I printed an enlargement and still have it hanging on the wall - was a complete accident. A shot of the pier at Bognor Regis was taken mid-afternoon but into the Sun (no filters used). The camera adjusted the light balance and produced a wonderful "evening" effect in sepia tones. It was not what I wanted originally but worked to produce something that I'm very proud of!

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author avatar Peter B. Giblett
1st Sep 2014 (#)

I still have the effect filters, but I have been unable to find an adapter for my new Digital SLR camera though.

John, if you hung around my old haunts and have similar interest (or so it seems) how come we have never met?

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author avatar Retired
1st Sep 2014 (#)

I lived in Bognor from 1978 to 1982 before moving to Salisbury, where I stayed until 1987.

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author avatar Smileworld
1st Sep 2014 (#)

You made me think of the photos I admired. Trick or real? Maybe, that question will remain in my brain when I see a photo. But, the truth is, i can never tell, unless there is a glaring feature.

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author avatar Peter B. Giblett
1st Sep 2014 (#)

&Smileworld - it should not really matter whether the picture is natural or modified if you like it then that is probably all that matters.

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author avatar Retired
1st Sep 2014 (#)

When I was a photographer I generally only used two filters - a polariser and a 1a UV filter (film and digital cameras). Now with photography only a hobby I don't use any filters and rarely bother to take a light reading. Exposure and depth of field settings are set based on experience. I take photos in raw or jpg format and use Gimp2 when I need to edit photographs. This is free software that rivals (expensive) Photoshop quite well.

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author avatar Peter B. Giblett
1st Sep 2014 (#)

Mike - I have never quite gotten into using Gimp, although I had it installed on my last PC.

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author avatar Retired
1st Sep 2014 (#)

It does have a really basic appearance, but is pretty smart software and easy to use. It is the only open source photo editing software that I would consider using. Most of the others seem to focus (pun?) on red-eye removal and distortion effects. Another good piece of software for photo editing is ACDSee. It is an image viewer and editor, but has a bundle of additional features. I'm not sure exactly, but I think it costs around $40.

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author avatar kant123
23rd Sep 2014 (#)

Nice to see Taj Mahal in pink and green...!! Awesome software...

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