Sharing your Writing: so Essential for Success

Peter B. GiblettStarred Page By Peter B. Giblett, 23rd Aug 2014 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/2v_8956o/
Posted in Wikinut>Writing>Tips

Writers love to be read, it is what drives their very existence, yet many may question why they bother given that so few people even know they exist. Sharing and SEO are a vital part of growing as a writer and gaining popularity and it is a vital part of the writer's craft that all should know more about.

Sharing is Good

Sharing your writing is always a good idea as it is important to gain new readers wherever you can. Truth is you cannot simply call people, or invite them to read your articles by email, it is something they will not be inclined to do.

Before I go one step further let me also say that using good quality, but exciting language is an important first step in being noticed, but once you have done that and published an article for the first time and it is out there on the Internet it can be tough to gain readers, unless you invite people to read your material in some manner and this article is all about how to do that.

A few weeks ago I was invited to write for LinkedIn Pulse, so I prepared and posted a piece but having never written on Pulse before I was uncertain as to how many people would read the article (even though I have more than 1,500 1st level connections on that network). Writing an article for the site is different than simply posting an update and I hoped that LinkedIn would share my item with connections (and possibly others) when they logged in and looked at their Welcome page. When I have crafted a new article normally I post updates on LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter over a 48 hour period (often by using the buffer application)

Of course Google (and other search engines) send their software-bots out searching the web and indexing pages so of course every page will be found even if there are no links on it, each published page will be ranked somewhere and you will always get some traffic by people searching the Internet for the topic of your article, but this is leaving it very much to chance and assumes you have used the right keywords.

Denise Larkin says "Share Your Writing"

Wikinut and Bubblews writer "Denise Larkin" has created a Facebook group called "Share Your Writing" which is a closed group for people to share any writing they have posted on-line. I am privileged to have been invited and I think it is a good idea to find ways to share what you have written with other like-minded people.

I fully favour ways to share and have found that having a specialised group has allowed me to be in touch with some writers that I would not otherwise know anything about. Having spoken with Denise I know that she will happily invite new members to her group, but you will have to contact her and invitations would be at her discretion - just tell her that you would like to become a member because of what I have discussed about sharing in this article.

Overall the more people that we are able to share with must produce a result that is better for us as a group of hard-working writers. I am certain there are other such groups around the social networks and being a member of many groups is likely to help raise your profile.

No "Like Sharing" or "Comment Trading"

Look at the terms and conditions of any website that earns from the posts that people provide and you will see something that says the organised trading of likes or comments is prohibited. There is good reason for this as on sites like Bubblews large groups of people organising a club to like each other's contributions could be detrimental to the financial stability of the site.

Yet in truth I know there is an active trading of likes on Bubblews. I have seen pages that are published with a headline that makes no sense at all and content that is hardly understandable in English yet the post has more than 700 likes. I could not in good conscience "Like" something that is so bad, how can so many like such junk unless they are organising a like-swapping club. Of the pages I have written the most popular has been read by a thousand people and liked by 75.

I have to question whether Mr Dixit is interested in quality content. That said I also know that many good writers use the site as a cash-cow and have to admit that is one of the reasons for publishing there.

Being Visible to the Search Engines

In theory if you write a good article that utilises the English language well and you put in a good Page Summary and add effective Post Tags then the search engines should be able to find your work, but if you do not wish to leave things to chance then you will have to do more than simply publish and sit back in order to earn money.

Wikinut writer Snerfu says "when you create content you have to think" about the needs of the Search Engines.and indeed tells us that there are ways you can submit your page in order to get more visitors, you must remember something the global corporations know is that for good Website visibility, the SEO work is an essential part of your publicity efforts, indeed they employ people to monitor and enhance the visibility of brand pages - especially at the times of year where additional publicity is crucial.

The importance of Page Tags

Having been criticised for stating "If you spent an hour writing your article and another hour researching all the reference material then if you spent a further two hours defining the keywords/tags". People will not view your page if they cannot find it so you should consider SEO very seriously, indeed this is one of the reasons I criticise those writers that post ten, or more items per day because they are not putting in the effort necessary to publicise their material, building visibility is so important for each and every article you produce.

Professional articles I write will be publicised on LinkedIn, Twitter, Google Plus and Facebook over a 48 hour period, both automatically and including questions or thoughtful posts that link back to the article. If I have posted a piece that was written simply for fun then I may not spend quite as much time publicising it - but even so my experience has shown that the more publicity you perform through social networks the better visibility your piece attains. Sometimes zero publicity effort equals zero readership. Page tags are vitally important because these include words you may wish to focus on in your publicity material, indeed they may bring a sub-culture of their own to the work.

Advantages of Social Sharing

Most on-line writers already know the value of their on-line social networks for making either professional or social connections but think about this for a moment. Add some publicity material about one of your articles onto Facebook, the third most popular site on the Internet, and your friends like or re-post your material then you stand some chance of having your content go viral, but even if you do not then the links from such a powerful site will help search engines recognise the value of your work. Do nothing and the people that you know will know nothing of the efforts you have made in researching and creating your article.

Much of my social sharing is automated, so when I post this it will be posted automatically on all social sites (except Google plus which seems to hate automation), yet I do not rely on automation alone to get the message out.

I am an open networker which means that I connect with people I do not know, the up-side is that more people will see my posts, but the down-side is that I get more spam (and desperate dating proposals) than most people.

A Combination of effort Brings results

The truth is it takes time to get noticed, do not imagine for one moment that publishing an article is enough for it to go viral. A couple of writers have told me that some of their early posts here on Wikinut were read by more than a thousand people during the course of a week and were done so with very little effort, but they also told me they do not know how because they did very little to publicise what they wrote. Knowing the articles in question I know they were well written and had a good set of page tags and that both writers let their social media network know about their article, they essentially hit on the right formula by accident, but having done it the first time they continued doing the same next time around although the results were not quite as good, proving that some subjects are more appreciated than others.

==== Image Credits

  • Gift of Sharing by morethanasandwich.wordpress.com
  • Share your Writing - the image from Denise Larkin's group
  • Sherlock Holmes by Skiphiremagazine.co.uk
  • Key words and tags Word cloud by Peter Giblett
  • LinkedIn icon from LinkedIn.com

The following are some of the more recent articles that Peter Giblett has published:

Each person has a unique voice and Wikinut is great a place for you to share some of your wisdom, insight and knowledge, you could start by adding a comment, but perhaps you need something more in which case should join Wikinut, write then become connected to others who share a passion for writing, supporting one another, and learning on Wikinut.

Tags

Comment Trading, Gaining Popularity, Invited To Write, Key Words, Like Sharing, Linkedin Pulse, Page Tags, Publicity, Seo, Share, Share Your Writing, Sharing, Writing

Meet the author

author avatar Peter B. Giblett
Author of "Is your Business Ready? For the Social Media Revolution"

Social media consultant, with C-Level background.

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Comments

author avatar Deepizzaguy
22nd Sep 2014 (#)

Thank you for sharing this information. It was very helpful.

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author avatar MarilynDavisatTIERS
23rd Sep 2014 (#)

Good evening, Peter - thank you for another informative article. I've gotten traction since I was included in Denise's "Share Your Writing", but this is a great intro for those unfamiliar with it. Social postings, Google Plus and using the tools that Wikinut provides at the end of the articles are something that all writers here need to use - you have outlined this well. Just all around solid piece, Peter. Again, thank you for your professional approach to writing - I value it. ~Marilyn

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author avatar Peter B. Giblett
23rd Sep 2014 (#)

I know it is best to have other people "Like" your work, but there should be nothing stopping you from tooting your own horn once in a while.

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author avatar Phyl Campbell
23rd Sep 2014 (#)

I agree with you about Google+. Perhaps I'm just so used to FB that the other seems alien to me.
I stopped being an open networker due to obnoxious spam -- loved your line about desperate date requests.

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author avatar Peter B. Giblett
23rd Sep 2014 (#)

All networkers do get spammed from time to time, and we get spam comments which I hope writers delete. There are tools available to bring robot readers, but in reality it is only through our network that we get human readers.

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author avatar Retired
23rd Sep 2014 (#)

Thank you for this information, Peter. Initially I was apprehensive about sharing my articles on FB, Twitter, LinkedIn and other websites, including my own website. One of the reasons is that even though I have been a professional copy writer for more than threes decades, the work is always defined by a set of rules and has a target audience determined by the client or specific products & services.

A similar set of rules apply when I write a book or catalogue for an exhibition, a hotel brochure, a technical manual, or a corporate SOP, for example. Such writing is anonymous because copy writers are the back room shadow workers of the advertising, exhibition and public relations world with no identity. Thus, we are shielded from public opinion.

But when it comes to writing something that is entirely up to me and has no set of rules to stop me from going wild, I am faced with the dilemma that probably affects many other writers - what if readers don't like what I write? What if no one even reads what I write?

Writing for the real world with a huge mix of readers and a less clearly defined audience has its challenges. Accordingly, I now review what I write before posting and ask myself - is this what I would want to read? If the conclusion is yes, then I consider it something worth posting on Wikinut and shared on social websites.

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author avatar Peter B. Giblett
23rd Sep 2014 (#)

Mike, Initially I was somewhat like you in that I wrote corporate reports, yet would have only been mentioned at the end as one of the contributors (even if I wrote 90% of the material) so I was initially reluctant to write, but then I found great freedom in doing so - even though I write mainly for the pleasure I do like to maximise my potential readership (and I guess income potential).

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author avatar Sivaramakrishnan A
23rd Sep 2014 (#)

I use only the links at the end of the article. I love writing my way and do not worry much about SEO and back links etc. Hopefully, I can move into that virgin territory. Thanks Peter for the useful tips and guidance - siva

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author avatar Peter B. Giblett
23rd Sep 2014 (#)

As I said before in theory we should not have to rely on back links, but if we wish to rank well in search results then we have to play the game.

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author avatar Denise Larkin
23rd Sep 2014 (#)

Thanks for sharing my group page here Peter.

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author avatar Denise Larkin
23rd Sep 2014 (#)

I have shared this article on my twitter page, tumbler, digg and on my Linkedin page. Your writing is superb!

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author avatar Peter B. Giblett
24th Sep 2014 (#)

Denise, glad to see you back here on Wikinut and I do thank you for sharing my article.

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author avatar Ptrikha
24th Sep 2014 (#)

Some very vital tips for getting more popularity for our articles. Normally, I do not get many likes on Bubblews, and at times, I suspect that If I will write sonmething without much quality and something describing how much time I took in consuming my morning cup of coffee etc. I could get more hits there.
Yet I am unable to fall below a level.

One of my posts on MongoDb got good hits(70+ views) on Twitter and 3 retweets, though I am yet to check how much people actually clicked to see my Bubblews post.

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author avatar Peter B. Giblett
24th Sep 2014 (#)

In the social networks there is an element of re-tweeting (or liking) and not looking, but remember every re-tweet is an opportunity that you may be read by a wider audience.

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author avatar cnwriter..carolina
24th Sep 2014 (#)

thanks for this information Peter...i am getting over 2000 views daily on google plus..i do add tags to my pages there...

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author avatar Ptrikha
29th Sep 2014 (#)

2000+ daily views on Google+! That is a big wow!

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author avatar Peter B. Giblett
24th Sep 2014 (#)

Carolina, Google Plus is a fun place to be and I can imagine you getting many supporters there.

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author avatar Utah Jay
26th Sep 2014 (#)

I write because I have to, so thank you so much for this info. It will be helpful to me.

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